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Aglaonema Care

Aglaonemas are often vibrant and colorful, with strikingly patterned leaves. Because they’re so easy-going, Aglaonemas are perfectly suited for a modern living room or office, dim bedroom, or cozy study. Because of their tolerance for both moist and dry conditions, and the fact that they will thrive with low light, they are a perfect choice for less than ideal light conditions or forgetful plant owners.

How to care for your Aglaonema

Use these instructions to care for an Aglaonema. This guide will tell you how to water an Aglaonema; its light, temperature, humidity preferences and any additional care it might need to help it grow.

Cutlass Aglaonema

LIGHT

By nature, Aglaonemas do best in well-lit locations such as a window sill with eastern light exposure. Bright, but indirect sunlight is optimal. Be careful not to put your Cutlass Aglaonema in full sun, as the leaves will burn. If you don’t have an ideal location for your Aglaonema, use a Grow Light. Your Cutlass Aglaonema will also tolerate, and even thrive in, low light areas. In most cases, artificial light found in windowless offices proves enough for this tough plant.

WATER

Water your Aglaonema when the top 50% of the soil is dry. Water until liquid flows through the drainage hole at the bottom of the pot and discard any water that has accumulated in the saucer.

HUMIDITY

This plant can survive in a low humidity environment, but it will thrive with a higher humidity level. Mist the leaves regularly using a Mister to raise the humidity.

TEMPERATURE

Cutlasses prefer temperatures in the 60’s and 70’s. Avoid cold drafts and sudden temperature changes.

FOOD

For best results, use a general houseplant fertilizer once a month during the spring and summer such as our All Purpose Fertilizer (20-20-20).

TOXICITY

Moderately toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will cause mouth and stomach irritation and possible vomiting.

ADDITIONAL CARE

A common problem with Aglaonema is called ‘tipping’ when the tips of the leaves dry out and turn brown. This can be caused by a variety of issues like overwatering, too much fertilizer, etc. The most common cause is tap water, which contains salts, chlorine, and fluoride. If you do not have a filtration system, leaving the tap water in an open container overnight before watering can help remove some of the chlorine and fluoride. If your Aglaonema is in need of a trim, clean up your plant using clean, sharp Plant Snips.

Indo Princess Aglaonema

LIGHT

Your Aglaonema prefers bright indirect light but can adapt to low light. If you don’t have an ideal location for your Aglaonema, use a Grow Light.

WATER

Water your Aglaonema when the top 50% of the soil is dry. Water until liquid flows through the drainage hole at the bottom of the pot and discard any water that has accumulated in the saucer.

HUMIDITY

Your Aglaonema prefers a humid environment. Mist the leaves regularly using a Mister to raise the humidity.

TEMPERATURE

Your Indo Princess Aglaonema prefers temperatures in the 60’s and 70’s. Avoid cold drafts and sudden temperature changes.

FOOD

Feed once a month during the spring and summer with a liquid fertilizer for indoor plants such as our All Purpose Fertilizer (20-20-20).

TOXICITY

Your Indo Princess is moderately toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will cause mouth and stomach irritation and possible vomiting.

ADDITIONAL CARE

If you find the tips of your plant’s leaves dry out and turn brown, it may be caused by your tap water, which can contain salts, chlorine, and fluoride. If you do not have a filtration system, leaving the tap water in an open container overnight before watering can help remove some of the chlorine and fluoride. If your Aglaonema is in need of a trim, clean up your plant using clean, sharp Plant Snips.

Pink Aglaonema

LIGHT

Your Aglaonema prefers indirect bright light. It can adapt to low light, but the growth will slow considerably. Direct morning sunlight is fine for this plant, but avoid direct afternoon sunlight which can burn the leaves. If you don’t have an ideal location for your Aglaonema, use a Grow Light. If you notice the pink coloration fading on your Aglaonema, try placing the plant in a brighter location with indirect light.

WATER

Water your Aglaonema when 50% of the soil volume is dry. Water until liquid flows through the drainage hole at the bottom of the pot and discard any water that has accumulated in the saucer.

HUMIDITY

Your Aglaonema enjoys extra humidity. Mist the leaves regularly using a Mister, place a humidifier nearby, or use a pebble tray to raise the humidity.

TEMPERATURE

Your Aglaonema prefers temperatures between 65–75°F. Avoid drafty areas and temperatures below 60°F in the winter.

FOOD

Feed your Aglaonema monthly during the spring and summer months with a general-purpose houseplant fertilizer diluted to half strength such as our All Purpose Fertilizer (20-20-20). No fertilizer is needed during the winter months when growth naturally slows.

TOXICITY

Your Aglaonema is mildly toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will cause mouth and stomach irritation and possible vomiting.

ADDITIONAL CARE

Aglaonema prefer to be slightly root-bound and will not need to be repotted more than once every 2-3 years. Choose a pot only about 1” bigger in diameter when repotting. If your Aglaonema is in need of a trim, clean up your plant using clean, sharp Plant Snips.

Pink Dalmatian Aglaonema

LIGHT

Bright indirect sunlight is optimal and will help your Pink Dalmatian Aglaonema produce the beautiful pink spots on its leaves. Be careful not to put it in full sun because, in many cases, the leaves will burn. If you don’t have an ideal location for your Aglaonema, use a Grow Light. This plant will tolerate low light areas but the leaf spots and variegation will not be as pronounced.

WATER

Water your Aglaonema when the top 50% of the soil is dry. Water until liquid flows through the drainage hole at the bottom of the pot and discard any water that has accumulated in the saucer.

HUMIDITY

This plant can survive in a low humidity environment, but it will thrive with a higher humidity level. Mist the leaves regularly using a Mister to raise the humidity.

TEMPERATURE

This plant prefers temperatures in the 60’s and 70’s. Avoid cold drafts and sudden temperature changes.

FOOD

Feed once a month during the spring and summer with a liquid fertilizer for indoor plants such as our All Purpose Fertilizer (20-20-20).

TOXICITY

The Pink Dalmatian Aglaonema is moderately toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will cause mouth and stomach irritation and possible vomiting.

ADDITIONAL CARE

A common problem with Aglaonema is called ‘tipping’ when the tips of the leaves dry out and turn brown. This can be caused by a variety of issues like overwatering, too much fertilizer, etc. The most common cause is tap water, which contains salts, chlorine, and fluoride. If you do not have a filtration system, leaving the tap water in an open container overnight before watering can help remove some of the chlorine and fluoride. If your Aglaonema is in need of a trim, clean up your plant using clean, sharp Plant Snips.

Pink Splash Aglaonema

LIGHT

Your Aglaonema prefers bright indirect light but can adapt to low light. If you don’t have an ideal location for your Aglaonema, use a Grow Light.

WATER

Water your Aglaonema when the top 50% of the soil is dry. Water until liquid flows through the drainage hole at the bottom of the pot and discard any water that has accumulated in the saucer.

HUMIDITY

This plant can survive in a low humidity environment, but it will thrive with a higher humidity level. Mist the leaves regularly using a Mister to raise the humidity.

TEMPERATURE

This plant prefers temperatures in the 60’s and 70’s. Avoid cold drafts and sudden temperature changes.

FOOD

Feed once a month during the spring and summer with a liquid fertilizer for indoor plants such as our All Purpose Fertilizer (20-20-20).

TOXICITY

The Pink Splash Aglaonema is moderately toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will cause mouth and stomach irritation and possible vomiting.

ADDITIONAL CARE

A common problem with Aglaonema is called ‘tipping’ when the tips of the leaves dry out and turn brown. This can be caused by a variety of issues like overwatering, too much fertilizer, etc. The most common cause is tap water, which contains salts, chlorine, and fluoride. If you do not have a filtration system, leaving the tap water in an open container overnight before watering can help remove some of the chlorine and fluoride. If your Aglaonema is in need of a trim, clean up your plant using clean, sharp Plant Snips.

Red Aglaonema

LIGHT

Your Aglaonema prefers bright indirect light but can adapt to low light. If you don’t have an ideal location for your Aglaonema, use a Grow Light.

WATER

Water your Aglaonema when the top 50% of the soil is dry. Water until liquid flows through the drainage hole at the bottom of the pot and discard any water that has accumulated in the saucer.

HUMIDITY

This plant can survive in a low humidity environment, but it will thrive with higher humidity levels. Mist the leaves regularly using a Mister to raise the humidity, especially during the drier winter months.  

TEMPERATURE

This plant prefers temperatures in the 60’s and 70’s. Avoid cold drafts and sudden temperature changes.  

FOOD

Feed once a month during the spring and summer with a liquid fertilizer for indoor plants such as our All Purpose Fertilizer (20-20-20).

TOXICITY

The Red Aglaonema is moderately toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will cause mouth and stomach irritation and possible vomiting.

ADDITIONAL CARE

A common problem with Aglaonemas is called ‘tipping’ when the tips of the leaves dry out and turn brown. This can be caused by a variety of issues like overwatering, too much fertilizer, etc. The most common cause, however, is tap water which contains salts, chlorine, and fluoride. If you do not have a filtration system, leaving the tap water in an open container overnight before watering can help remove some of the chlorine and fluoride.   If your Aglaonema is in need of a trim, clean up your plant using clean, sharp Plant Snips.

Silver Bay Aglaonema

LIGHT

Your Aglaonema prefers bright to medium indirect light, but can also adapt to low light. Prolonged exposure to direct light can burn the leaves. If you notice the coloration fading on your Aglaonema, try placing the plant in a brighter location with indirect light. If you don’t have an ideal location for your Aglaonema, use a Grow Light. Your Silver Bay Aglaonema will also tolerate and even thrive, in low light areas. In most cases, artificial light found in windowless offices proves enough for this tough plant.

WATER

Water your Aglaonema when 50% of the soil volume is dry. Water slowly, allowing it to soak into the soil, until liquid flows through the drainage hole at the bottom of the pot. Discard any water that has accumulated in the saucer.

HUMIDITY

Your Agaonema does well in average household humidity. However, if the air is very dry it will appreciate the occasional humidity boost.

TEMPERATURE

Your Aglaonema prefers temperatures between 65-75°F. Avoid drafty areas and temperatures below 60°F.

FOOD

Feed your Aglaonema monthly during the spring and summer months with a general-purpose houseplant fertilizer diluted to half strength. Feed once during the fall season. No fertilizer is needed during the winter months when growth naturally slows.

TOXICITY

Your Aglaonema is toxic to humans and pets if ingested.

ADDITIONAL CARE

Aglaonema prefers to be slightly root-bound and will not need to be repotted more than once every 2-3 years. Choose a pot about 2” bigger in diameter when repotting. If your Aglaonema is in need of a trim, clean up your plant using clean, sharp Plant Snips.

Spring Snow Aglaonema

LIGHT

Your Aglaonema prefers bright indirect light but can adapt to low light. If you don’t have an ideal location for your Aglaonema, use a Grow Light.

WATER

Water your Aglaonema when the top 50% of the soil is dry. Water until liquid flows through the drainage hole at the bottom of the pot and discard any water that has accumulated in the saucer.

HUMIDITY

Your Spring Snow Aglaonema can survive in a low humidity environment but will thrive with higher humidity levels. Mist the leaves regularly using a Mister, place a humidifier nearby, or use a pebble tray to raise the humidity. 

TEMPERATURE

Your Spring Snow Aglaonema prefers temperatures between 65-75 degrees. Avoid cold drafts and sudden temperature changes.

FOOD

Feed once a month during the spring and summer with a liquid fertilizer for indoor plants such as our All Purpose Fertilizer (20-20-20).

TOXICITY

Your Spring Snow Aglaonema is moderately toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will cause mouth and stomach irritation and possible vomiting.

ADDITIONAL CARE

If you notice the tips or edges of your plant’s leaves are turning brown, often with a yellowish hue at the edge, it could be due to your tap water. Allow your tap water to sit out overnight before watering so the chlorine and fluoride can evaporate. Alternatively, you can water with filtered water or rainwater. Remove any yellow leaves to keep your plant strong and growing.  If your Aglaonema is in need of a trim, clean up your plant using clean, sharp Plant Snips.

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What's an Aglaonema?

Botanical Classification: Araceae (family)

About

Because of their tolerance for both moist and dry conditions, and the fact that they will thrive with low light, they are a perfect choice for less than ideal light conditions or forgetful plant owners.

Aglaonemas are often vibrant and colorful, with strikingly patterned leaves. Because they’re so easy-going, Aglaonemas are perfectly suited for a modern living room or office, dim bedroom, or cozy study.

Fun Fact

Aglaonemas are exceptional air purifiers.

Pictured Left: Cutlass Aglaonema