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Philodendron Care

Philodendrons are fast-growing, easy plants. They range in growth pattern from graceful and vining to bold and bushy. Philodendrons are generally forgiving and will tolerate all kinds of neglect including low light, poor soil, and inconsistent watering.

How to care for your Philodendron

Use these instructions to care for a Philodendron. This guide will tell you how to water a Philodendron; its light, temperature, humidity preferences and any additional care it might need to help it grow.

Philodendron Heartleaf

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LIGHT

The Philodendron Heartleaf can cope with low light conditions, but grows faster and produces more leaves bright indirect light. Do not put it in direct sunlight–the sun will burn the foliage.

WATER

Water your Philodendron Heartleaf well and allow the top 50% of the soil to dry before watering again. Yellow leaves may indicate overwatering, while brown leaves mean the plant needs more water.

HUMIDITY

Basic household humidity is fine for this Philodendron, but higher humidity encourages larger leaves. Your plant will benefit from the occasional misting.

TEMPERATURE

Your Philodendron Heartleaf will grow well in temperatures between 65-80 degrees during the day and above 55 degrees at night. Keep it away from drafts, especially during the winter months.

FOOD

Feed your Philodendron Heartleaf monthly in the spring and summer with a basic houseplant food diluted to half the recommended strength. Fertilize every other month in the fall and winter months.

ADDITIONAL CARE

Trim out any dead, discolored, damaged, or diseased leaves and stems as they occur. Use clean, sharp scissors to avoid tearing or bruising the stems. Snip stems just above a leaf node. Wash the leaves frequently to prevent dust from clogging its pores. If you wish to propagate, take stem tip cuttings during the Spring or early Summer and place the stem in water or moist soil and they should root quite easily.

TOXICITY

Philodendron leaves are toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will result in swelling of the lips and tongue, and stomach irritation with possible vomiting.

Philodendron Brasil

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LIGHT

The Philodendron Brasil can survive in low light conditions, but grows faster and produces more leaves in medium or bright indirect light. The variegation will be more pronounced in higher light. Do not put it in direct sunlight since the sun will burn the foliage.

WATER

Water your Philodendron well and allow the top 50% of the soil to dry before watering again. Yellow leaves may indicate over watering, while brown leaves mean the plant needs more water.

HUMIDITY

Basic household humidity is fine for your Philodendron Brasil, but higher humidity encourages larger leaves. Your plant will benefit from the occasional misting.

TEMPERATURE

Your plant will grow well in temperatures between 70-80 degrees during the day and above 55 degrees at night. Keep it away from drafts, especially during the winter months.

FOOD

Feed the Philodendron Brasil monthly in the spring and summer with a basic houseplant food diluted to half the recommended strength. Fertilize every other month in the fall and winter.

TOXICITY

Philodendron leaves are toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will result in swelling of the lips and tongue, and stomach irritation with possible vomiting.

ADDITIONAL CARE

Trim out any dead, discolored, damaged, or diseased leaves and stems as they occur. Use clean, sharp scissors to avoid tearing or bruising the stems. Snip stems just above a leaf node. Wash the leaves frequently to prevent dust from clogging its pores.

Philodendron Hope Selloum

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LIGHT

Your Philodendron Hope Selloum prefers bright, indirect light—placing it near an east or south facing window is ideal. It will, however, survive in lower light and the leaves will turn a darker green. Direct sun or too much light will burn or fade the leaves.

WATER

Water your plant when its soil becomes dry to a depth of 1-2 inches. Water the plant until water flows into the saucer, then pour out any excess. Don’t allow the pot to stand in water, as this will cause root rot. During the winter, water less often, keeping the soil barely moist.

HUMIDITY

The Philodendron Hope Selloum has thinner leaves than many of its relatives and requires more humidity to flourish. Mist your plant regularly especially during the drier winter months.

TEMPERATURE

Your Philodendron Hope Selloum likes warm temperatures above 55 degrees. Keep them away from drafts and open doors, especially during the winter.

FOOD

Fertilize monthly during the spring and summer with a balanced, water-soluble fertilizer diluted to half the recommended strength. If light levels are high, increase to bi-weekly feeding. Too much plant food can cause excess salt to build up in the soil which can result in leaf burn.

ADDITIONAL CARE

Prune your Philodendron Hope Selloum with sharp scissors to control its size and shape. You can remove entire leaves be cutting them off at the base of the leaf stem. Be sure to wear gloves when pruning and wash your hands and tools when finished—you don’t want to get the sap in your eyes or mouth. Always clean dead or decaying leaves from the soil and dust it once a month to keep your plant healthy.

TOXICITY

Philodendron leaves are toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will result in swelling of the lips and tongue, and stomach irritation with possible vomiting.

Philodendron Lemon Lime

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LIGHT

The Philodendron Lemon Lime can cope with low light conditions, but grows faster and produces more leaves bright indirect light. Do not put it in direct sunlight–the sun will burn the foliage.

WATER

Water your Philodendron Lemon Lime well and allow the top 50% of the soil to dry before watering again. Yellow leaves may indicate overwatering, while brown leaves mean the plant needs more water.

HUMIDITY

Basic household humidity is fine for this Philodendron, but higher humidity encourages larger leaves. Your plant will benefit from the occasional misting.

TEMPERATURE

Your Philodendron Lemon Lime will grow well in temperatures between 65-80 degrees during the day and above 55 degrees at night. Keep it away from drafts, especially during the winter months.

FOOD

Feed your Philodendron Lemon Lime monthly in the spring and summer with a basic houseplant food diluted to half the recommended strength. Fertilize every other month in the fall and winter months.

Additional Care

Trim out any dead, discolored, damaged, or diseased leaves and stems as they occur. Use clean, sharp scissors to avoid tearing or bruising the stems. Snip stems just above a leaf node. Wash the leaves frequently to prevent dust from clogging its pores. If you wish to propagate, take stem tip cuttings during the Spring or early Summer and place the stem in water or moist soil and they should root quite easily.

Toxicity

Philodendron leaves are toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will result in swelling of the lips and tongue, and stomach irritation with possible vomiting.

Philodendron Little Hope

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LIGHT

Your Philodendron Little Hope prefers bright, indirect light—placing it near an east or south facing window is ideal. It will, however, survive in lower light and the leaves will turn a darker green. Direct sun or too much light will burn or fade the leaves.

WATER

Water your plant when its soil becomes dry to a depth of 1-2 inches. Water the plant until water flows into the saucer, then pour out any excess. Don’t allow the pot to stand in water, as this will cause root rot.

HUMIDITY

This tropical plant prefers a bit of humidity and will benefit from regular weekly misting.

TEMPERATURE

Your Philodendron Little Hope likes warm temperatures above 55 degrees. Keep it away from drafts and open doors, especially during the winter.

FOOD

Fertilize monthly during the spring and summer with a balanced, water-soluble fertilizer diluted to half the recommended strength. If light levels are high, increase to bi-weekly feeding. Too much plant food can cause excess salt to build up in the soil which can result in leaf burn.

ADDITIONAL CARE

Always remove any decaying plant material from the soil to keep your plant healthy and happy.

TOXICITY

Philodendron leaves are toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will result in swelling of the lips and tongue, and stomach irritation with possible vomiting.

Philodendron Prince of Orange

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LIGHT

Your Philodendron Prince of Orange can survive in low light conditions, but grows faster and produces more leaves in medium or bright indirect light. If the leaves are pale in color, the plant may be getting too much light. Do not place in direct sunlight–the sun will burn the foliage.

WATER

Water your Prince of Orange until water flows freely from the drainage holes located in the bottom of the pot. Allow the soil to dry out slightly between waterings. Your Prince of Orange is sensitive to overwatering. If the soil remains constantly wet, the roots will rot. 

HUMIDITY

Basic household humidity is fine for your Prince of Orange, but higher humidity encourages larger leaves. Your plant will benefit from occasional misting. 

TEMPERATURE

Your Prince of Orange will grow well in temperatures between 65-80 degrees during the day and above 55 degrees at night. Keep it away from drafts, especially during the winter months.

FOOD

Feed your Prince of Orange monthly in the spring and summer with a basic houseplant food diluted to half the recommended strength.  If the leaves curl or the tips turn brown, it may be getting too much fertilizer. No fertilizer is needed in the winter months. 

Additional Care

As the plant ages, the bottom leaves will fall off or turn brown. Use clean, sharp scissors to avoid tearing or bruising the stems. Trim out any dead, discolored, or damaged, leaves.  Wash the leaves frequently to prevent dust from clogging its pores. Your Prince of Orange loves to lean towards the light, so rotating it every week or so will help it stay full on all sides.

Toxicity

Your Prince of Orange leaves are toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will result in swelling of the lips and tongue, and stomach irritation with possible vomiting.

Philodendron Velvet

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LIGHT

Your Philodendron Velvet can adapt to lower light conditions, however, when placed in bright indirect light, it grows faster and produces more leaves. Avoid direct sunlight–the sun will burn the foliage.

WATER

Water your Philodendron Velvet well and allow the top half of the soil to dry before watering again. Yellow leaves may indicate overwatering, while brown leaves mean the plant needs more water.

HUMIDITY

Basic household humidity is fine for your Philodendron Velvet, but higher humidity will encourage larger leaves. Your plant will benefit from an occasional misting.

TEMPERATURE

Your Philodendron Velvet will grow well in temperatures between 65-80 degrees during the day and above 55 degrees at night. Keep it away from drafts, especially during the winter months.

FOOD

Feed your Philodendron Velvet monthly in the spring and summer with a basic houseplant food diluted to half the recommended strength. No need to fertilize in the fall and winter months, when growth naturally slows.

TOXICITY

Philodendron leaves are toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will result in swelling of the lips and tongue, with stomach irritation and possible vomiting.

ADDITIONAL CARE

Trim any dead, discolored, damaged, or diseased leaves and stems as they occur. Use clean, sharp scissors to avoid tearing or bruising the stems. Snip stems just above a leaf node. Wash the leaves frequently to prevent dust from clogging its pores. If you wish to propagate, take stem tip cuttings during the spring or early summer and place the stem in water or moist soil and they should root quite easily.

Philodendron Xanadu

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LIGHT

Your Philodendron Xanadu prefers medium to bright indirect light—placing it near an east or south-facing window is ideal. It will, however, survive in lower light and the leaves will turn a darker green. Direct sun or too much light will burn or fade the leaves.

WATER

Water your Philodendron Xanadu when its soil becomes dry to a depth of 1-2 inches. Water the plant until water flows into the saucer, then pour out any excess. Don’t allow the pot to stand in water, as this will cause root rot. During the winter, water less often, keeping the soil barely moist.

HUMIDITY

Your Philodendron Xanadu will tolerate the level of humidity found in most homes, but high humidity promotes lush growth and shiny foliage, so it is a good idea to mist the plant regularly.

TEMPERATURE

Your Philodendron Xanadu likes warm temperatures above 55 degrees. Keep them away from drafts and open doors, especially during the winter.

FOOD

Fertilize monthly during the spring and summer with a balanced, water-soluble fertilizer diluted to half the recommended strength. Never apply fertilizer to dry soil, always make sure soil is damp before applying plant food.

TOXICITY

Philodendron Xanadu leaves are toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will result in swelling of the lips and tongue, and stomach irritation with possible vomiting.

ADDITIONAL CARE

Yellow leaves on your Xanadu occur naturally as new growth comes in or if it is acclimating to a new spot in your home. Remove these yellow dead or dying leaves regularly by snapping them off where the leaf stem touches the primary stem or the soil surface. It is also a good idea to periodically look between the dense foliage and remove the dried leaf husks left behind when a new leaf is produced. Regularly clearing away this dead organic material prevents mold, fungus, and worst of all Fungus Gnats.

Philodendron Birkin

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LIGHT

Your Philodendron Birkin prefers very bright, indirect light. It can survive in medium light conditions, but growth may slow. The variegation on its leaves will be more pronounced in higher light. Do not put it in full, direct sunlight as it will burn the foliage.

WATER

Water your Philodendron when the top 50% of soil is dry. Water until liquid flows through the drainage hole at the bottom of the pot and discard any water that has accumulated in the saucer.

HUMIDITY

Basic household humidity is fine for your Philodendron Birkin, but higher humidity encourages larger leaves. Your plant will benefit from regular misting.

TEMPERATURE

Your plant will grow well in temperatures between 70-80 degrees during the day and above 55 degrees at night. Keep it away from drafts, especially during the winter months.

FOOD

Feed your Philodendron Birkin monthly in the spring and summer with a basic houseplant food diluted to half the recommended strength. Fertilize every other month in the fall and winter.

TOXICITY

Philodendron leaves are toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will result in swelling of the lips and tongue, and stomach irritation with possible vomiting.

ADDITIONAL CARE

Trim out any dead, discolored, damaged, or diseased leaves and stems as they occur. Use clean, sharp scissors to avoid tearing or bruising the stems. Snip stems close to soil level. Wash the leaves frequently to prevent dust from clogging its pores.

Philodendron Brandi

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LIGHT

Your Philodendron Brandi can survive in low light conditions, but grows faster and produces more leaves in medium or bright indirect light. The silver coloring will be more pronounced in higher light. Do not place in direct sunlight, as the sun will burn the foliage.

WATER

Water your Philodendron well and allow the top 50% of the soil to dry before watering again. Yellow leaves may indicate over watering, while brown leaves mean the plant needs more water.

HUMIDITY

Basic household humidity is fine for your Philodendron Brandi, but higher humidity encourages larger leaves. Your plant will benefit from the occasional misting.

TEMPERATURE

Your plant will grow well in temperatures between 70-80 degrees during the day and above 55 degrees at night. Keep it away from drafts, especially during the winter months.

FOOD

Feed your Philodendron Brandi monthly in the spring and summer with a basic houseplant food diluted to half the recommended strength. Fertilize every other month in the fall and winter.

TOXICITY

Philodendron leaves are toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will result in swelling of the lips and tongue, and stomach irritation with possible vomiting.

ADDITIONAL CARE

Trim out any dead, discolored, damaged, or diseased leaves and stems as they occur. Use clean, sharp scissors to avoid tearing or bruising the stems. Snip stems just above a leaf node. Wash the leaves frequently to prevent dust from clogging its pores.

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What's a Philodendron?

Botanical Classification: Philodendron cordatum green

Full Description

Philodendrons are fast-growing, easy plants. They range in growth pattern from graceful and vining to bold and bushy. Philodendrons are generally forgiving and will tolerate all kinds of neglect including low light, poor soil, and inconsistent watering. A Philodendron is a great first-time houseplant or gift for anyone who wants to enjoy the natural beauty of plants without a lot of maintenance.

Fun Fact

There are nearly 500 species of Philodendron!

Pictured Left: Philodendron Heartleaf
plant mom
Trailing Philodendrons can be very easily propagated. Stem cuttings with at least two joints, called nodes, will easily root in water after a few weeks.
- Plant Mom

Philodendron Heartleaf

Unique and trailing with heart-shaped leaves
very easy, perfect for beginners, low to bright indirect light
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